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GSB to Host Half-Day Program Focused on Helping Cannabis Businesses Transition to Maturity

On Thursday, November 3, Garvey Schubert Barer’s Cannabis Industry Group will be presenting Cannabis 2016: Transitioning from Infancy to Maturity, a half-day educational program geared toward helping companies thrive amid the industry’s fluid business environment.  As the cannabis industry has been undergoing a rapid maturation, nascent enterprises are quickly evolving into sophisticated businesses.  This session will provide best practices and guidance to help manage business and operational issues to ensure the long-term growth and success of industry members.

Cannabis 2016 is tailored specifically for cannabis processors, producers, retailers and ancillary businesses, and it will cover topics that include:

  • Managing a more experienced marijuana workforce
  • Making decisions regarding human resources
  • Managing financial risk and insurance issues
  • Navigating state-specific regulations

Moderators and speakers at the seminar will include GSB Cannabis Industry Group co-chairs Emily Harris Gant and Andy Aley, and GSB Labor & Employment attorneys Jared Van Kirk and Mike Brunet.  Dani Espinda of ACT Resources, PLLC and Norm Ives of Mosaic Insurance Alliance, LLC will also be presenting.  Additionally, there will be two enforcement officers from the Washington State Liquor and Cannabis Board in attendance who will be available to answer questions from session attendees.

An article featuring the event was recently published in MJ Headline News.

Date and Time:
Thursday, November 3, 2016
1:00 – 4:30 pm, cocktail reception to follow

Location:
Garvey Schubert Barer
1191 Second Avenue, 6th floor
Seattle, WA 98101-2939

Cost:
Free

RSVP:
There are still a few seats still available! RSVP to Bonnie Chung at bchung@gsblaw.com or at 206-816-1487.

This program is co-hosted by Garvey Schubert Barer, ACT Resources and Mosaic Insurance Alliance.

Warning Regarding Federal Law: The possession, distribution, and manufacturing of marijuana is illegal under federal law, regardless of state law which may, in some jurisdictions, decriminalize such activity under certain circumstances.  Penalties for violating federal drug laws are very serious.  For example, a conviction on a charge of conspiracy to sell drugs carries a mandatory minimum prison term of five years for a first offense and, depending on the quantity of marijuana involved, the fine for such a conviction could be as high as $10 million.  In addition, the federal government may seize, and seek the civil forfeiture of, the real or personal property used to facilitate the sale of marijuana as well as the money or other proceeds from the sale. Although the U.S. Department of Justice has noted that an effective state regulatory system, and a marijuana operation’s compliance with such a system, should be considered in the exercise of investigative and prosecutorial discretion, its authority to prosecute violations of federal law is not diminished by the passage of state laws which may decriminalize such activity. Indeed, due to the federal government’s jurisdiction over interstate commerce, when businesses provide services to marijuana producers, processors or distributors located in multiple states, they potentially face a higher level of scrutiny from federal authorities than do their customers with local operations.

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Since its founding in 1966, Garvey Schubert Barer has counseled clients across a broad range of industry sectors. Our attorneys have deep bench experience and significant expertise in both complex legal and business matters. We value innovation and entrepreneurship, and closely monitor industry trends. It is with these values in mind that our firm established the cannabis industry group. Read More ›

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