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Posts from January 2018.

Businesses and entrepreneurs on both sides of the Pacific should be aware and celebrate that just as cross-border commerce is increasing, so, too, is international judicial recognition of commercial judgments, as evidenced by recent Chinese and Washington State court rulings.

In 2017, a Chinese court, perhaps for the first time, enforced a U.S. commercial judgment.   An article by Dr. Jie (Jeanne) Huang published by University of New South Wales’ China International Business and Economic Law initiative [1] reported on the 2017 decision, which recognized and enforced a monetary judgment from the Los Angeles County Superior Court. The case is Liu Li v. Tao Li and Tong Wu [2] decided by the Intermediate People’s Court of Wuhan City, China.   

International travelers from and to the United States may increasingly encounter an inspection of personal electronic devices conducted by U.S. Customs and Border Protection (“CBP”) officers. The selection may be for a variety of reasons, which may include that the traveler does not have the proper travel document or visa; the person has previously violated U.S. laws; or the person might be selected randomly for a search.

U.S. employers who sponsor foreign workers for temporary H-1B work visas should start preparing now for the upcoming H-1B cap filing season commencing this year on Monday, April 2, 2018. Employers should start identifying those first-time H-1B workers for which petitions will be filed during the first five business days in April. International students holding F-1 visas are the most common beneficiaries for these "quota subject" H-1B petitions.


On January 2, 2018, the Committee on Foreign Investment in the United States (CFIUS) rejected Ant Financial’s plan to acquire U.S. money transfer company MoneyGram International over national security concerns. According to Reuters’ report, CFIUS rejected the deal due to concerns over the safety of data that can be used to identify U.S. citizens. The companies have already undergone the CFIUS process three times and proposed safeguard measures, but these efforts did not clear CFIUS’s concerns. The companies decided to terminate their deal after CFIUS rejected their proposal. Ant Financial needs to pay MoneyGram a $30 million termination fee for the deal’s collapse.

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The International Practice Group of Garvey Schubert Barer is a cross-disciplinary group of attorneys practicing in areas ranging from business transactions, immigration, maritime, government regulatory work, transportation and logistics, and estate planning. The group members include bilingual and multicultural attorneys who are well-versed in handling these subject matters in a cross-border context. The firm’s attorneys have been actively practicing in the international arena since the early 1970s. 
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