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Posts from January 2016.

Small toy house on leavesLike a fly that can’t keep away from the flame, the U.S. Supreme Court has decided to add a Fifth Amendment Takings Clause case to its docket for 2016. More than 25 years have passed between the U.S. Supreme Court incursions into the use of the takings clause regarding conditions of approval in cases such as Dolan v. City of Tigard, Nollan v. California Coastal Commission, and the US Supreme Court’s 2013 decision Koontz v. St. Johns Water Management District.  The Court has decided to wade back into the takings mire once again. Rather than dealing with efficacy of land use conditions, as with the issue as in Nollan, Dolan, and Koontz, this time the issue relates to the “parcel as a whole” rule.

ThornhillThe City of Bend is in dire need of more housing at all income levels, particularly affordable housing. In a November 2015 presentation to the Housing Land Advocates, Jim Long, the City’s  Affordable Housing Manager, reported that the housing market is so tight in Bend that he receives calls from hospitals looking for homes for new doctors, in addition to the low income population his office is meant to serve. Despite the demand for affordable housing, the case of Kine v. City of Bend (LUBA No. 2015-068, December 24, 2015) represents how difficult it is to increase the supply within city limits.

Red barrierState ex rel Dept. of Transp. v. Alderwoods (Oregon), Inc., 2015 WL 9589848, --- P.3d --- (2015)

The Oregon Supreme Court held that a government’s use of its police powers to eliminate or limit access to a property for public safety reasons is not compensable under Article I, Section 18 of the Oregon Constitution, so long as reasonable access to the abutting public right-of-way is maintained. The Court summarized its holding in the following proposition:

Skyline_farm_city clipartThere were two failed efforts to expand Woodburn’s Urban Growth Boundary (UGB), initially begun in 2005 which would allow the city to plan, annex and develop lands around the existing city limits. UGB expansion in Oregon requires evaluation of two sets of factors: one relating to the need for expansion for the 20-year timeframe required by law, and the other relating to the location of the revised UGB. Based on city population projections, additional lands for residential use were anticipated. The rub was over the total amount of lands needed for future residential, commercial, industrial, and employment uses, as well as the location of the revised UGB. 

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We regularly update clients about changes in real estate law and on industry trends. This includes briefing clients on legislative proposals in the federal tax, housing and other legal areas affecting their businesses. Staying current enables you to anticipate and prevent legal problems as well as capitalize on new developments.
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