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Posts from March 2016.

ApartmentsAs part of a four-bill package – SB 1533, SB 1573, HB 4143, and HB 4079 - the Speaker of the House, Tina Kotek used the short session to try and push housing advocates’ agenda forward, but the bills got hijacked by development interests. This post explores the so-called inclusionary zoning bill, Senate Bill 1533. Inclusionary zoning is a planning tool that requires new housing developments to offer a portion of the new units at affordable levels for purchase or rent.

Housing advocates never expected inclusionary zoning to singularly solve the affordable housing crisis, but hoped it would be one avenue to create equitable neighborhoods. The hope was to have affordable housing placed in all neighborhoods, near transit options, fresh food, and quality schools. But, at the end of the day, Oregon jurisdictions are left with little in the way of mandating inclusionary housing, except for possibly, the City of Portland.

thumbnailVosse v. City of New York, 2015 WL 7280226 (S.D.N.Y.) was a First Amendment suit by an apartment dweller against the City and its Building Commissioner over an illuminated peace symbol on the exterior of Plaintiff’s 17th floor apartment. Illuminated signs were prohibited more than 40 feet from the ground in the applicable zoning district, but the regulations made an exception for “flags, banners or pennants” on certain religious, philanthropic or community structures. Plaintiff contended the regulation was content-based and thus unconstitutional. The trial court granted summary judgment, finding that Plaintiff lacked standing. The Second Circuit first affirmed, then reconsidered the case in the light of Plaintiff’s alternative argument that assumed standing for an alternative contention that, even if content-neutral, the regulation was not a reasonable time, place and manner restriction.

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We regularly update clients about changes in real estate law and on industry trends. This includes briefing clients on legislative proposals in the federal tax, housing and other legal areas affecting their businesses. Staying current enables you to anticipate and prevent legal problems as well as capitalize on new developments.
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