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iStock_000040764222_LargeThe Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) wasted no time in finalizing the new affirmatively furthering fair housing rules the day after the U.S. Supreme Court upheld disparate impact claims under the Fair Housing Act in Texas Department of Housing Affairs v. Inclusive Communities Project, Inc. (see last week’s post for a summary of that case). Disparate impact results from governmental policies that may not have been intended to create segregation, but do in fact result in segregation. The Supreme Court’s ruling upholds the Fair Housing Act’s prohibition on discrimination caused by policies or practices that have an unjustified disparate impact because of race, color, religion, sex, familial status, national origin, or disability.

The new rule requires certain public entities (“entitlement jurisdictions” that receive federal funding for housing) that have, under previous HUD rules, been required to prepare an Analysis of Impediments to Fair Housing (AI) to prepare an Assessment of Fair Housing Report (AFH). The AFH meets standardized reporting requirements, and is drafted to assist program participants in reducing disparities in housing choice, and to provide access to housing opportunities, particularly for those with protected status.  The overall goal of the new reporting requirement is to expand economic opportunity and enhance quality of life.

These rules are a game changer for land use planning. HUD is proactively getting involved in the business of zoning for fair housing, not just financing units. HUD recognizes that fair housing issues may arise from factors such as zoning and land use, including the proposed location, design, and construction of housing; public services that may be offered in connection with housing (e.g., water, sanitation); and related issues. According to HUD, the AFH approach focuses primarily on assisting program participants in being better informed, and better able to set goals and priorities.  In particular HUD wants to ensure that the following conditions will be taken into consideration when making funding decisions in a particular jurisdiction - patterns of integration and segregation; racially or ethnically concentrated areas of poverty; disproportionate housing needs; and housing-related barriers in access to education, employment, and transportation, among others.

While local jurisdictions will remain in local control of land use decisions and adoption of zoning regulations under the new rules, entitlement jurisdictions are called on to provide a specific analysis of land use programs that may inhibit affirmatively further fair housing. In addition to HUD’s final rule, HUD’s Assessment Tool, adopted in 2014, and guidance to be issued in the near future, will assist recipients of federal funding to use that funding and, if necessary, adjust their land use and zoning laws in accordance with their existing legal obligation to affirmatively further fair housing.

Zoning and land use laws that are barriers to fair housing choice and access to opportunity can be quite varied and the determination of whether a barrier exists often depends on the factual circumstances in specific cases.  One example is zoning and land use laws that were intended to limit affordable housing in certain areas in order to restrict access by low-income minorities or persons with disabilities. The City of Black Jack took egregious zoning actions in the 1970s that prevented construction of low-income multifamily housing that had a racially discriminating effect and was found to violate the Fair Housing Act.  U.S. v. City of Black Jack, 508 F.2d 1179 (1974).  An example of a positive zoning action that would further fair housing would be the removal of such an ordinance. HUD intends to include additional examples in its guidance for its affirmatively furthering fair housing regulations.

Closer to home, Oregon’s 2015 legislature had a clear path to a remove a barrier to affirmatively furthering fair housing, but the Oregon Senate would not even take a public vote on House Bill 2564 to remove the constitutional ban on mandatory inclusionary zoning. Instead, the bill died in committee after having passed the House. Inclusionary zoning is a tool that requires new developments of housing to construct a particular percentage of new units for qualifying low-income home seekers. While the Oregon Senate failed to move forward, the State’s Draft Fair Housing Report 2016-2020 contains a finding that the state’s ban on inclusionary zoning “limits housing choice for persons of color and low income persons.” The AI included in the report states:

Disallowing inclusionary zoning as part of a community’s affordable housing toolkit limits the provision of affordable housing in general. In addition, limits on the use of inclusionary zoning may disproportionately affect members of protected classes to the extent that they have a greater need for affordable housing. This situation is called discriminatory effect or disparate impact.

With the fuel from the Supreme Court’s decision, as well as the new HUD regulations, Oregon’s leaders would be wise to avoid potential challenges and pick off low-hanging fruit like overturning the ban on inclusionary zoning.  Such action is an easy first step to remove barriers for protected classes and avoid disparate impact challenges.

Affordable_Housing_Clackamas_CountyLast September, the comment period on a federal Department of Housing and Urban Development’s (“HUD”) proposed rule closed. That rule portends a very different course in the expectations of state and local governments in dealing with affordable housing.  While retaining the prohibitions on housing discrimination, the new rule (now being reviewed by the Office of Management and Budget) requires taking proactive steps “to address significant disparities in access to community assets, to overcome segregated living patterns and support and promote integrated communities, to end racially and ethnically concentrated areas of poverty, and to foster and maintain compliance with civil rights and fair housing laws.”

Most local governments take federal funds for housing or urban development, which implicates the new rules.  Those funds take the form of loan guarantees, urban renewal grants, homelessness programs, disaster relief, transportation and other infrastructure funds and a variety of other means.  A state or local grantee is “required to submit a certification that it will affirmatively further fair housing (“AFFH”), which means that it will (1) conduct an analysis to identify impediments to fair housing choice within the jurisdiction; (2) take appropriate actions to overcome the effects of any impediments identified through that analysis; and (3) maintain records reflecting the analysis and actions in this regard.”  The AFFH obligation extends to all housing and housing-related activities in the grantee’s jurisdictional area whether publicly or privately funded.

One effect of the new rule, which is likely to be challenged in the federal courts, is that housing issues will not be treated in isolation, but in a relationship with other drivers of urban development.  Thus, the connections between affordable housing and transportation or zoning, community expenditures in public services and facilities, racial or ethnic segregation and residency preferences or requirements are relevant issues for analysis and action.

Potentially, the new rule is not another effort at paper shuffling to deal with housing needs.  Receipt of federal housing funds requires repeated AFFH certifications of compliance with the analysis, action and records obligations noted above.  The rule requires action to deal with problems identified, in part, by the use of uniform data.  A state or local government may thus be sued for doing nothing in the face of an identified problem.  Moreover, for those public agencies that certify compliance and do nothing or which support efforts to thwart affordable housing, litigation may be brought under the False Claims Act and if the AFFH certifications were false, treble damages and attorney fees may be awarded, with a possible share going to a “relator,” one who “blows the whistle” on a non-complying government.

The case of Westchester County, New York, even though brought under current law, is instructive.  Although certifying that it was affirmatively furthering fair housing when it received over $52 million in federal grants over the years, the County did not consider race-based impediments to fair housing choice even though it was part of one of the most segregated regions in the country.  The County made no mention of housing discrimination or residential segregation and was successfully sued by a nonprofit activist organization under the False Claims Act.  The federal government joined the suit and a settlement was ultimately reached under which 750 affordable housing units must be built within 7 years in the “whitest” neighborhoods of the County, the County must return $30 million to HUD because of its false certifications, $21.6 million of which was to Fund Integrative Units (which was supplemented by another $30 million from the County), which was also required to pay $7.5 million to the “Relator” for ferreting out false claims and another $2.5 million in attorney fees and costs.  While the racial overtones of the County’s actions were extreme, the new rule raises the bar for reporting, actions and records required of state and local governments in housing matters.

Because the new rule does not depend on federal funding for enforcement, it is likely that nonprofit affordable housing organizations will follow the lead of their environmental brethren to undertake enforcement activity, using the “bounty” provided by the False Claims and Civil Rights Acts to fund further enforcement.  If the rule is enacted and survives OMB review and court challenges, the national housing picture will be very much changed indeed.  In Oregon, the new rule may spell the end on the statutory provision against inclusionary zoning and Metro’s prohibition on forcing higher densities in existing neighborhoods.  We all may be in for a very bumpy ride indeed.

 

HUD housing and urban developmentOn June 10, 2014, the City of San Jacinto, in Riverside County, California, entered into a consent decree with the Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) to resolve a lawsuit alleging disability discrimination under the Fair Housing Act (FHA) and Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA).  The City agreed to change its land use laws governing group home living, and to pay a total of $746,599 in compensatory damages to housing providers and former residents with disabilities, as well as a $10,000 civil penalty to the United States.  The damages also include private plaintiffs’ attorneys’ fees and costs.

The settlement marks an end to an almost two-year-old complaint, but a six–year-old battle, where private group home operators claimed the City enacted an ordinance intended to exclude unlicensed and some licensed homes for persons with disabilities, and by targeting homes for persons with disabilities for enforcement of the ordinance and other local laws.

On October 3, 2008, the City Council amended the San Jacinto Zoning Code (the “Zoning Code") by approving Ordinance 08-14 (the “ordinance"), which was passed by unanimous vote of the council.  The ordinance amended the Zoning Code's definition of "Group Home" or "Group Housing" to "[a] residence or dwelling, other than a hotel, wherein two (2) or more rooms, with or without individual cooking facilities, are rented to individuals under separate rental agreements or leases, either written or oral, whether or not an owner, agent, or rental manager is in residence, in order to preserve the residential character of the neighborhood."  The ordinance specifically exempted certain state-licensed congregate living facilities, such as "community care facilities," from its definition of "group homes," making those with six or fewer residents permitted uses in residential zones.

Prior to and after the City's enactment of the ordinance, the city's zoning code defined "family" as "an individual or two (2) or more persons related by blood, marriage or legal adoption, or a group of not more than 6 persons who are not related, living together as a single house-keeping unit in a dwelling unit."

In conjunction with the passage of the ordinance, the City’s code enforcement officers, including uniformed officers of the County Sherriff’s Department, investigated group homes. These actions included intrusive and direct questioning of residents about whether they were on parole, on medication and/or recovering from addiction.  After these investigations, the City continued to cite providers of group homes for persons with disabilities for illegal operation of a group home in a residential zone.

Thereafter, the City allowed for a reasonable accommodation process to consider placing group homes in residential neighborhoods, but its proposed conditions were not acceptable to group home providers and they filed a complaint.

HUD’s investigation led to findings that the City had, in fact, discriminated against people with disabilities under the FHA and ADA.  The consent decree provides the following injunctive relief:

  • The City shall not impose restrictions on housing for persons with disabilities not imposed on housing for an equal or greater number of persons without disabilities.  Actions prohibited include, but are not limited to, the imposition, through any provision or practice, of numerical occupancy limits on group housing for unrelated persons with disabilities that is more restrictive than numerical occupancy limits for families or other unrelated persons.
  • The City was required to adopt new ordinances to establish a new zoning classification, "Group Homes for Persons with Disabilities," and amend the City's reasonable accommodation procedure.
  • The City is required to maintain records of all oral and written requests for reasonable accommodation or modification and the City's responses thereto for a period of three (3) years following the date of the request and the group home’s response, as applicable.
  • The City shall not impose any additional fees, costs, or otherwise retaliate against any person who has exercised his or her right under the FHA or ADA to make one or more requests for reasonable accommodation or modification.
  • Immediately upon entry of the consent decree, the City shall cease any efforts to close or bring other enforcement actions against housing for persons with disabilities operated in accordance with the FHA and the ADA, including but not limited to, homes for persons with disabilities operated by the complainants (City by Aurora Beltran and Rajeeyah Bilal-Vamey located at 325 East Third Street and 1835 Rogers Way, respectively), so long as these homes continue to operate in compliance with all laws.
  • The City is required to appoint a Fair Housing Compliance Officer, and City staff, City Council members, Planning Commissioners, and the Sherriff’s officers are required to undergo fair housing training.

HUD’s investigations of fair housing violations are taking an expensive toll on local governments.  If you advise a city that is considering restrictive zoning; or differential treatment of the number of family members as compared to the number of unrelated people with disabilities that can live together in the same zone, then consider the San Jacinto consent decree as a warning to take such actions cautiously.  If the ordinance ultimately results in unfair treatment to group home providers, then do not be surprised if fair housing advocates complain to HUD.

 

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