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The Central Eastside Industrial Council and other interested businesses sought LUBA review of the City of Portland’s decision that a houseless rest area and tent camp for houseless persons was a Community Service Use allowed in the General Industrial Zone (IG1 Zone). The city’s decision would have allowed the Right 2 Dream Too (“R2DToo”) Camp to relocate from downtown Portland to land near Oregon’s Museum of Science and Industry. The subject property is designated as an industrial sanctuary in the city’s Comprehensive Plan.

In 2007, when the legislature established a system for designating urban and rural reserves, many observers saw the reserve process as a panacea to deal with the contentious process of changing the Portland Metro urban growth boundary (UGB). Under the urban reserve process, identifying urban land needs based on a 50-year projection rather than the historic 6-year cycle for changing the UGB, lands designated urban reserve would stand in the queue prioritized for inclusion in the UGB when expansion was appropriate. Similarly, land within any rural reserve was off-limits for consideration within the UGB within that same 50-year planning period.

Carman-HistoricThe City of Lake Oswego added the Carman House to its inventory of historic landmarks in 1990, pursuant to Statewide Planning Goal 5.  The oldest extant residential structure within the City, the Carman House is considered a rare and valuable example of a territorial Oregon residence.  The owners at the time, Mr. Wilmot and Mr. Gregg filed an objection to the designation.  However, since the city could designate a property as historic without a property owner’s consent, the property was designated over the owners’ objections.

Jogger at a parkThe Oregon Public Use of Lands Act, ORS 105.672 et seq., provides immunity from tort liability to private and public owners of land that is made available to the public for recreational purposes.  The purpose of the Act is to encourage both private and public landowners to open their lands to the public.  In Johnson v. Gibson, 358 Or 624 (2016), the Oregon Supreme Court answered the question posed to it by the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals: Does the recreational immunity provided in the Public Use of Lands Act extend to employees of a landowner?  The Oregon Supreme Court found that it did not.

ApartmentsAs part of a four-bill package – SB 1533, SB 1573, HB 4143, and HB 4079 - the Speaker of the House, Tina Kotek used the short session to try and push housing advocates’ agenda forward, but the bills got hijacked by development interests. This post explores the so-called inclusionary zoning bill, Senate Bill 1533. Inclusionary zoning is a planning tool that requires new housing developments to offer a portion of the new units at affordable levels for purchase or rent.

Housing advocates never expected inclusionary zoning to singularly solve the affordable housing crisis, but hoped it would be one avenue to create equitable neighborhoods. The hope was to have affordable housing placed in all neighborhoods, near transit options, fresh food, and quality schools. But, at the end of the day, Oregon jurisdictions are left with little in the way of mandating inclusionary housing, except for possibly, the City of Portland.

Finally some good news in Portland’s retail real estate market.  National commercial real estate investment company, Marcus & Millichap, rated Portland No. 6 on the 2012 list of the country’s top retail real estate markets for investors.  According to the firm, Portland showed strength in retail sales and growth in high-tech manufacturing jobs, which should be good news for retail tenants and landlords.  The firm also predicted rent hikes in high traffic urban districts as retail vacancies decline.  The increase in commercial retail tenants in the area should attract real estate investors to the Portland market, providing a welcomed boost.  And with more retail tenants comes more jobs.  All good things in this economy.

View Oregonian article.

The City of Portland Bureaus of Development Services and Sustainable Development proposed a series of incentives for the development of green energy technologies or “green bundle” within the City back in July of 2009.  This “green bundle” was part of a number of other technical amendments to the City Zoning Code known as RICAP 5.  The green amendments included exempting eco-roofs from design review, setting standards for the location of water cisterns and wind turbines and exempting roof-mounted solar panels from design review in non-historic areas. 

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